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The Emergence of The Powerful Mind

March 25th, 2011

A powerful mind emerges when a person decides to engage in a certain activity for a prolonged period of time. The powerful mind finds comfort in the continuous engagement of the same activity. The powerful mind does it over and over again until it feels as if no thought is required to perform the activity or action. The emergence of the powerful mind can only happen when a person embraces and accepts both the rationality and irrationality of their own madness (embracing and accepting your own individual sanity and insanity). In other words, when the individual can feel completely comfortable in only the breath of their own thought, the individual taps into the power of their own mind and does not feel any automatic or involuntary urges to connect with other individuals (i.e. – I feel as if I must communicate with someone today in order to accomplish any task).

It must be noted, though, that connection with people is vitally important to the completion of tasks. When individuals continually connect with one another in a positive and supportive manner, they intuitively begin to be aware of what the other is doing and subsequent subconscious (and unconscious) gestures will be made to remind the individual of what they need to do in order to contribute the greater whole or society.

Yet we cannot discount the importance of the powerful mind in isolation. The powerful mind in isolation is left to its own devices without any influences from external sources. The powerful mind finds peace and tranquility in being thrown in the labyrinth without a ball of string. The powerful mind can see that the only way out of the maze is to turn inward and trust the feelings which reside there. As the internal feelings begin to be trusted, the individual being naturally begins to guide itself out of any uncertainties or any unsolvable existential riddles.

The powerful mind in isolation can feel that internal implosions do not have the ability to obliterate the internal being. In this sense, internal implosions only have the ability to temporarily derail and depress the individual into a reduced state of being and doing. Be, think, feel, act, do. Feel, be, act, think, do. Act, feel, think, be, and do.

As the powerful minds in isolation oscillates between feel, think, be, act, and do (act and do are virtually the same by the way with a major distinction that to act is to pretend whereas to do is to engage in meaningful behavior that provides something to surrounding members of society), it begins to operate in a perfect rhythm with all parts of the being harmonized toward the direction of goal completion and some variation of self-actualizing or being the best one has the ability to be.

Some notable authors and thinkers in the field refer to this notion as self-efficacy; an individual’s belief in their self that they are competent on a daily basis. Self-efficaciousness is nothing new and there is no need to dwell on it at this juncture of time.

Do you feel as if you have tapped into your powerful mind?

Matthew Polkinghorne

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  1. March 28th, 2011 at 10:32 | #1

    THis often happens to me when I am writing – I get lost in the labyrinth, time goes away, I lose track of everything except what’s in my head and going on the paper. There’s a name for this, called “Flow”, which is when your gifts and talents are lined up with a challenging project that you get lost in – it is also a means of fulfillment and purpose. I forget the name of the psychologist who coined this term, who does the research on this, but it’s right in line with your idea here.

  2. April 8th, 2011 at 15:18 | #2

    Jill Bolte Taylor tapped into her powerful mind when she had a stroke and the left hemisphere of her brain became inactive (http://www.ted.com/talks/jill_bolte_taylor_s_powerful_stroke_of_insight.html).

    I really love this writing by Albert Dussault; http://freeassociations.wordpress.com/consciousness-left-vs-right/ it reminds me of what you have written here.

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